fbpx

Heritage Expeditions welcomes its newest ship to its adventure fleet

New Zealand based cruise company Heritage Expeditions has announced that the exploration vessel formerly known as MS Hanseatic and briefly as Society Adventurer is the latest member of its fleet. 

The 124-metre vessel has been renamed Heritage Adventurer, with Heritage Expeditions delighted with the new addition. 

Directors of Heritage Expeditions, Aaron and Nathan Russ spoke about how Heritage Adventurer will boost the company’s operations and enhance passengers’ experience.

Heritage Adventurer, with its legendary history of Polar exploration firsts and superior ice capabilities, will take centre stage as our new flagship effortlessly adding new levels of comfort and sophistication to the authentic, intimate small group expeditions Heritage Expeditions was founded on,” said Mr Aaron Russ.

A bit of work will be required to get the vessel ready for Heritage Expeditions, “over the coming months we will be working closely with the owners to coordinate an overhaul and refurbishment in preparation of Heritage Adventurer joining our fleet,” said Mr Nathan Russ.

The ship has an impressive history, built in Finland in 1991 the vessel was designed specifically for polar exploration. On 26 August 2014, she got within 480km of the North Pole, an achievement that was unmatched by any other passenger ships at the time. 

Despite being originally designed to allow for 184 guests, Heritage Adventurer will operate at a capacity of 140 passengers to allow for greater onboard comfort and more intimately curated experiences. 

Heritage Adventurer will start writing the next chapter of her history in Russian’s Far East and Wrangel Island in May 2022 before heading south towards the South Pacific, New Zealand and ultimately into the heart of Antarctica. 

Heritage Expeditions was founded by the Russ family in New Zealand in 1985 and consistently aim to be pioneers not only in exploration but also in environmental responsibility and conservation contribution.

Click here to find out more