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Do you want to cruise but have a companion who simply can’t see the point?

“Cruising isn’t authentic travel”, they say. “And there are dangers: pirates, illness, sinking ships. And are they bad for the environment? Weeks on a floating hotel: pfft! I prefer hotels I can leave, thankyou…”

As with most things, we form our judgements from what we know. In an information age with a seemingly infinite range of subject matter, let’s face it: unless it’s vocational, our knowledge is often a scrap of questionably sourced facts and figures. And, as for our opinions: a couple of charismatic comments from friends usually suffice.

If you’re keen to take a cruise and your partner is stubbornly refusing, why not play the information game and see where it takes you?

Lets look at some of the information and opinions non-cruisers rally to their cause.

Excuse 1: “It’s not authentic travel.”

Your reply: “A port stay is what you make it.”

While many passengers may arrive in port and immediately wander the streets or take a quick tour, it only takes a little research, independence and a spirit of adventure to make a port stay a more meaningful one. To really get to know a place, opt out of the organised tours and prepare to venture out alone. Put your research skills to work on the port’s social and cultural background and figure out where the locals go for art, entertainment, shopping, a drink or whatever it is you’re interested in. When your ship hits port, make a b-line for these areas and open yourself up to new experiences – making sure, of course, to take the necessary security precautions.

“Choose the right cruise line.”

Non-cruisers tend to have formed their opinions on cruising from a limited knowledge of the industry. Let them know that not all cruise lines are the same. Some may offer the experiences they are looking for; whether it be indulging in all-inclusive luxury or cruising around the Russian Far East in a bare-essentials expedition ship, chances are there’s a cruise to suit every need. Want to know which are the best cruise ships ? Cruise Passenger readers selected their favourite ships through a survey. Read the list here

Excuse 2: “It’s dangerous.”

Your reply: “Sinking ships and pirates are few and far between.”

Of the few cruise ships that have sunk in recent history, passengers were easily evacuated on the numerous life rafts obligatory to each vessel. And, while attacks by pirates do occur, very few have been successful and many cruise lines have acquired technologies and sophisticated security measures to evade them. Pirate attacks also tend to occur in certain hot zones that cruise lines generally avoid.

Excuse 3: “I’ll get seasick.”

Your reply: “Not likely”

Experiencing the ocean on a cruise ship is significantly different to experiencing it in smaller vessels. While seasickness does sometimes occur, the size of the ship means the motion of the water is felt a lot less and ships are now built with stabilizers that reduce rocking. Here’s how you avoid being seasick

“Plan and take precautions.”

Seas are rougher and calmer at different times of the year and cruises can be planned accordingly. The Mediterranean, for example, is calm in summer, but gets a bit rough after October. And, what about river cruising? No rough seas there.

Additionally, falling sick is a risk wherever you travel. With cruising, the same rules apply: take precautions and the risk is reduced. Exercise, sleep well and eat healthily (plenty of fruit and vegetables) in the weeks leading up to and during your cruise: this will increase the strength of your immune system. And keep clean: bring disinfectant wipes and instant hand sanitisers and use them religiously.

Excuse 4: “Cruising is bad for the environment”

Your reply: “Not if we take the right cruise.”

Some cruise lines are now incredibly environmentally conscious. Check out our feature, Best Green Cruise Lines and share what you learn.

Port Authority of New South Wales

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